Center for Advanced Dentistry-Ushma Patel D.M.D.




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Originally uploaded by Dr. Ushma Patel Dentist

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Atlanta, Johns Creek, Suwanee, Alpharetta, Cumming, Dentist Office Sedation, Implant, Cosmetic Family Dentistry

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Interest Free Financing – Affordable Monthly Payments

Did you know that on approved credit you can finance 100% of your dental treatment in the Alpharetta, Suwanee, Johns Creek, Duluth, Cumming and Atlanta area of Georgia (GA) and make affordable monthly payments over time. This program allows you to begin your treatment today with affordable monthly payments that are INTEREST FREE for the contract term. This will allow you to pay for your Dental services over six or twelve months. It is especially ideal for co-payments, deductibles, and treatments not covered by insurance. Applying for financing offered through this CareCredit is quick and easy. For more info visit CareCredit.com. You will get a revolving line of credit that you can use at many participating healthcare providers including Center for Advanced Dentistry for you and your family including your pet.

Healthy Atlantans Seek a Fresh Start in Dental Care

It seems like so many people try to hit the reset button on January first. It’s an age-old ritual of self-evaluation and goal setting, and then predictably forgetting about our intentions sometime along the line of mid-January.

I am here to do more than passively listen to my patients’ intentions. I play an integral role in their overall health through preventative care, education, reinforcing positive habits, and open accessibility. My dental practice is easy to reach from anywhere in the Johns Creek, Duluth, Cumming and Alpharetta area in Georgia and my team will work with you to set up convenient appointments and respect your time while you are here.

I want you to know it is never too late to take control of your dental hygiene, or even start over again if you’ve tried before and faltered. No matter how long it has been since you have seen a dentist, I am not here to scold. I am here to welcome you back and help you repair any outstanding dental issues. As a dentist, I regularly see the accumulated results of bad habits firsthand. The health of your mouth, teeth and gums is measurable, and I can give my patients the education, treatment, and tools necessary to arrest further damage.

Do you need a reason other than an occasional cavity, sore or bleeding gums, or bad breath to take oral hygiene seriously in your quest for self-improvement or recommitment to health in 2010?

I’d like to share something with you that many people are surprised to learn. Medical experts have discovered a link between periodontal (dental) disease and coronary (heart) disease. Many of my patients are amazed to learn about this correlation, but experts have actually found that the bacteria in a person’s mouth can travel into the bloodstream through the gums and clump in artery plaques.

According to the American Academy of Periodontology, people with periodontal disease are nearly twice as likely to have coronary disease. The health of a person’s mouth is becoming as much of a predictor of heart disease as the cholesterol levels we’ve relied on to warn us of coronary issues in the past.

With the start of the New Year and with the spirit of self-assessment we all feel comes with it, won’t you speak to your dentist about taking care of any outstanding dental issues you may be experiencing?

Please contact me or your regular dentist to take your daily habit of brushing one step further. You’re already halfway there when you pick up the toothbrush; you adopt the rest of a good dental strategy to keep your mouth—and potentially your life, strong and healthy?

Trouble thinking? Better see the dentist. Study Shows Connection between Gum Disease and Memory Problems

From Dentalblogs.com: We know that gum disease is the leading cause of tooth loss for American adults. It also causes an increased risk for health problems, from heart attack and stroke to diabetes complications and low-weight births. But new evidence shows that periodotnal disease can impair mental function, outside of the established connection between gum disease and Alzheimer’s or dementia. The newfound link may stem from inflammation in the body that originates in the mouth.

The study, led by Dr. James Noble, involved 2,350 subjects of various genders who were tested for periodontal disease, then underwent a series of mental skills assessments. Adults over 60 with a high level of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a pathogen that causes gum disease, were three times more likely to forget a three-word sequence after a time lapse. The higher the pathogen level, the greater the potential for forgetting the sequence.
Published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, this US study by Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York relates periodontal disease to cognitive dysfunction. More research is necessary to support the findings. Read the Reuters press release here.

For more on your local Atlanta, Johns Creek, Alpharetta, Duluth, Cumming Dentist visit www.JohnsCreekFamilyDentist.com

Why Aren’t You on The List My Company Says Are Preferred Providers?

Although we accept most PPO Dental Insurance and help you get most out of your benefits, we are not on any PPO/HMO/DMO list. We’ve been asked “Why Aren’t You on The List My Company Says Are Preferred Providers?” occasionally when a patient’s company switches to an HMO/PPO plan. I could give you a wishy-washy, sugar coated answer like some dentist do. But I think my patients deserve the real answer.

Three or four insurance companies solicit every dentist each month to join their plan. Contrary to popular belief there is no quality control or screening process even though it sounds like you will be joining an elite family of dentists. The “elite” are simply whoever signs up. “Preferred Provider” is an insurance industry term, it has nothing to do with a dentists skills, knowledge or experience.

THE FREE LUNCH

The promotional material we get from these multi billion dollar insurance companies is very appealing. It appears everyone wins in this deal: the patients now get FREE or greatly reduced) cleanings, x-rays, exams and perhaps even fillings. Even the major treatment is much cheaper. They’re ecstatic! Your employer has much cheaper dental insurance premiums to pay each month they’re ecstatic! If you have been following the profits of the HMO/PPO industry, you know they are making money hand over fist. The insurance executives are the most highly paid in the business world. So we know they are ecstatic too.

This must be the mystical free lunch at last. Who could lose? Unfortunately someone has to absorb the cost of all this free or cheap treatment. You guessed it, it’s the HMO/PPO dentist.

Now, You ask, “Why would anyone work harder for less money?”

Well my friends, that’s the $64 question. Let’s look at why anyone would do this. The insurance industry dazzles dentists with promises of wealth, endless patients and busy practices. Then they add, “Oh did we forgot to mention that you have to give away many services for free and cut the rest of your fees 30-40%? But don’t worry about that,” they point out, “because you will have two to four times as many patients to try and see in order to make up for the lost revenue. You’ll just have to work faster.”

Ok, so that’s the dentist complaint. What about you, the patient. How does all this affect you? Here’s how; Understand that an HMO/PPO dentist is paid 6-10 dollars per month per family or patient whether or not that patient ever shows up in your office. Now if that patient does want to come in and get there teeth cleaned or a filling done (which the dentist is by contract required to do for FREE) do you think that dentist (or anyone else in the practice) actually wants that patient to come in? Of course not. He doesn’t make any money when the patient comes in. Does it make any sense to pay someone not to perform their craft or practice to their profession?

Now do you see why it might be difficult for you to be seen for a routine visit or in an emergency in one of these practices? The biggest complaints from patients about HMO/PPO practices are they can’t get an appointment and they never see the same dentist twice. Is there any mystery now as to why?

TOO MANY CUT CORNERS

In my opinion, to be an HMO/PPO dentist I would have to sacrifice quality, service and the personal attention we give to our patients. In short we would have to give up our ethical and clinical standards. I won’t do that and it’s an easy choice to make. I won’t practice on roller skates, sacrificing quality for the sake of quantity. As an HMO practice we would have to use cheap labs, cheap materials, work faster and cut corners. Some of the corner cutting would come in the area of sterilization, by not providing as many disposables as we now do. My patients are too important for us to do that to them. The medical profession has all but lost the war to the insurance industry. The story has been well documented in a recent TIME magazine cover story. The dental profession still offers you the freedom to choose your own dentist and level of care. And as long as that continues, I will endeavor to provide you with the best dentistry has to offer. You deserve nothing less.

Sincerely,

Dr. Ushma Patel, D.M.D.
Center for Advanced Dentistry