Costly complications of untreated or undertreated periodontitis (Gum Disease)

If Gum Disease is left untreated it leads to costly complications:

  • Further spread of infection
  • More tissue damage
  • Surgery
  • Loss of teeth
 Periodontitis potentially affects overall health:
  • Heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Diabetes
  • Pre-term, low birth-weight babies

Source: http://www.myarestin.com/

To schedule an appointment in the Atlanta area of Suwanee, Johns Creek, Alpharetta, Duluth, Cumming, for a dental check-up call Dr, Ushma Patel’s dental office Center for Advanced Dentistry at 770-623-8750, visit http://www.johnscreeksedationdentist.com/ for more information.

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NBC Today Show:Want to live longer Drink wine, have sex and floss everyday

>>> this morning on “today’s” health, cutting your risk for heart disease. about 80% are preventable, but despite that it’s still the number one killer of both men and women in the u.s. so what should we be doing to keep our heart’s healthy? dr. kerry peterson is an internist and contribute to “women’s health” magazine. a lot of us have heart disease in our families. is genetics the whole ball game? is that true or can we really change our behaviors and make a difference?

>> genetics play a role but of course there are things you can do. if you’re a child of a parent who has heart disease you’re more at risk, especially if your dad had heart disease before age 55 or mom, before age 65.

>> the first thing we recommend is people people have heard before, exercise. the single most important lifestyle change you can make.

>> that’s correct. for both men and women, regular exercise, first off, work out the heart muscles so it works more efficiently and it reduces the likelihood of developing all the specters for heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes.

>> how much do you have to do?

floss everyday to prevent gum disease

Animation Videos & Slides on Dental procedures from My Dental Hub Web Site Content

Welcome

To view animations or image slides click on the links below. For more information click here.

View Animations and Slideshows

button Endodontics (Root Canal Treatments)
button Esthetics and Restorative (Fillings, Veneers and Inlays)

All Ceramic Crowns On Fractured Teeth

All Ceramic Crowns Replacing Old Restorations

All Ceramic Single Crown

Bleaching of Teeth

Cast Post and Core with Crown

Cast Post and Core with Crown

Cracks In Heavily Restored Teeth

Crown Prep of Damaged Tooth

Crown Procedure

Crown with CEREC CAD – CAM System

Esthetic Inlays

Esthetic Post and Core with Crown

Esthetic Post and Core with Crown

Failing Restorations

Fractured Teeth – Non Restorable

Lower Posterior Crown

Metal-Ceramic vs All-Ceramic Crowns

Orthodontic and Prosthetic Treatment

Porcelain Fused To Metal Crowns

Porcelain Inlays

Porcelain Veneers

Prefabricated Post and Core with Crown

Prefabricated Post and Core with Crown

Progression of Tooth Decay

Replacing Old Veneers With New Veneers

Single Crown – Chipped Tooth

Smile Design Principles

Smile Design Principles

Smile Design Principles – Tissue Height

Smile Design Principles – Tooth Proportion

Types of Posts

Veneers

Veneers

What is a Veneer

Whitening with Trays

Why Crown (Cap) a Tooth

Your Teeth, Your Health

Zoom Whitening System
button Implants (Tooth Replacement with Artificial Roots)

Allografting – Exposed Threads

Bone Atrophy – Lower Mandible

Bone Atrophy – Upper Maxilla

Bone Grafting

Bone Grafting – Socket Preservation

Ceramic vs Metal Crowns with Implants

Effects of Loss of Teeth – Female Front View

Effects of Loss of Teeth – Female Side View

Effects of Loss of Teeth – Male Front View

Effects of Loss of Teeth – Male Side View

Effects of Single Tooth Loss

Esthetically Compromised Implant Restorations

Facial Effects of Tooth Loss – Female

Facial Effects of Tooth Loss – Male

Fixed-Detachable Prosthesis

Fixed Reconstruction – Implant Supported

Implant Placement Into Socket

Implant Placement Into Socket – Two Centrals

Implant Procedure

Implant Procedure – Diagram

Implants in Esthetic Zone

Implant Site Tissue Defect

Implant Supported Overdenture (Clinical)

Implant Supported Overdenture (Model)

Implant vs. Bridge

Locator Attachments for Lower Denture

Locator Attachments for Upper Denture

Lower All – On – 4

Lower All On 4

Lower Denture with Locator Attachment

Lower Fixed Detachable

Lower Guided Fixed Detachable

Lower Overdenture with 3 implants

Mandible Crown and Bridge Reconstruction

Milled Bar Implant Supported Overdenture (Clinical)

Milled Bar Implant Supported Overdenture (Model)

Milled Bar Procedure

Milled Bar Procedure – 4 Implants

Natural Tooth vs. Implant

Posterior Implant Supported Three Unit Bridge

Premature Aging Due To Bone Loss – Female Front View

Premature Aging Due To Bone Loss – Female Side View

Premature Aging Due To Bone Loss – Male Front View

Premature Aging Due To Bone Loss – Male Side View

Reconstruction with Multiple Implants

Restoring a Fractured Tooth with an Implant

Ridge Collapse

Single Esthetic Implant

Single Implant Placement – Lateral Incisor

Single Implant – Upper Posterior

Single Tooth Implant

Single Tooth Two Stage Procedure – Central Incisor

Single Tooth Two Stage Procedure – Cuspid

Sinus Lift – Lateral

Sinus Lift – Vertical

Sinus Lift – Vertical (Summers Technique)

Smile Design Principles

Three Unit Bridge

Two Implant Over Denture

Upper All – On – 4

Upper All On 4

Upper Denture with Locator Attachment

Upper Fixed Detachable

Upper Guided Fixed Detachable

Upper Implant Supported Bar Overdenture
button Oral Surgery (Wisdom Teeth and Other Surgeries)
button Orthodontics (Tooth Straightening)

Class III Surgical Correction

Class II Surgical Correction

Cleaning Braces With Floss

Clear vs Metal Braces

Congenitally Missing Teeth

Cross Bite

Esthetic Benefits of Orthodontic Treatment

Extrusion of Teeth

Invisalign Braces

Lingual Wear of Upper Teeth

Malocclusion – Class I

Malocclusion Class I

Malocclusion – Class I (Graphic)

Malocclusion – Class II

Malocclusion – Class II Adult

Malocclusion – Class II, Division I

Malocclusion Class II Division I

Malocclusion – Class II, Division II

Malocclusion Class II Division II

Malocclusion – Class II, Division II (Graphic)

Malocclusion – Class III

Malocclusion Class III

Malocclusion – Class III (Graphic)

Mandibular Asymmetry

Maxillary Expansion – Mixed Dentition

Normal TMJ Function

Open Bite

Posterior Crossbite

Proclined Upper Teeth

Space Regainer

TMJ – Anterior Disc Displacement

Treatment Adult Orthodontics – Class II

Treatment of Class III Malocclusion

Treatment of Class II Malocclusion

Treatment of Class II with Bicuspid Extraction

Treatment of Class I Malocclusion
button Periodontics (Gum Disease)

Bone Loss with Furcation Defect

Connective Tissue Graft – Lower Teeth

Connective Tissue Graft – Upper teeth

Crown Lengthening Before Crowns

Crown Lengthening for Esthetics

Crown Lengthening – Overview

Crown Lengthening – Procedure

Endodontic Periodontic Lesion

Frenectomy

Gingivectomy with Laser

Gingivectomy with Scalpel

Gingivitis

Grafting for Periodontal Defect

Horizontal Bone Loss

Lateral Pedicle Graft

Mild Periodontal Disease

Moderate Periodontal Disease

Peri-Implantitis

Periodontal Disease

Periodontal Disease

Pocket Reduction – Esthetic Considerations

Pocket Reduction Procedure

Root Coverage – Alloderm

Root Coverage Graft

Root Hemisection

Scaling and Root Planning Therapy

Scaling Calculus

Severe Periodontal Disease

Stages of Periodontal Disease

Tissue Graft to Treat Recession

Vertical Bone Loss
button Preventive (Maintenance)

http://www.mydentalhub.com/weblink/index.php?

Link between Unhealthy Gums and Cancer !!!

Latest research finds direct link between unhealthy gums and cancer throughout the body !!!

The link between gum disease and oral cancer has been clear for sometime. Now the latest research also links poor oral hygiene to increasing cancer risk throughout the body, including breast cancer. In fact, one study showed a 75% increase in breast cancer in women with gum disease compared to women who didn’t have gum disease.

The danger occurs if you don’t brush and floss effectively. Bacteria forms in the mouth, plaque builds up, and inflammation forms in the gums, increasing the possibility of cancer anywhere in the body. Because of hormonal changes that occur during monthly menstruation and menopause, women experience more gum sensitivity and inflammation, putting them at greater risk.

You must practice proper brushing and flossing. The average American brushes for 38 seconds a day, but you really need to brush for about 2 minutes and also floss daily. See your oral health care provider to determine if you have too much plaque build up. You can also find out by chewing dental plaque disclosing tablets that can be ordered online.

Besides flossing and brushing, add this extra secret weapon: neem bark extract. Neem bark extract acts as an anti-inflammatory to prevent gum disease and can also be ordered online; take it in a cup of tea or simply dilute it in a little hot water once a day as part of your oral hygiene routine.


Dr. Ushma Patel
Center for Advanced Dentistry
www.JohnsCreekSedationDentist.com
770-623-8750

Five Things Your Dentist Really Wants You To Know

Five Things Your Dentist Really Wants You To Know

1. Don’t Wait ‘Til It Hurts. This old adage continues to ring true today. So many patients procrastinate a checkup or treatment simply because of the false notion that “nothing hurts.” Gum disease is a silent, painless, progressive killer of teeth that is also a source of chronic low-grade inflammation to the whole body. Tooth decay is also painless until it becomes deep, which puts you at risk of needing more extensive dentistry such as root canal treatment.

 2. Plan your work and work your plan. Always get a prioritized treatment plan for the problems that may exist in your mouth. Even if you cannot do all the treatment at the same time, you can get your treatment done in order of importance or necessity to minimize incurring unnecessary costs from disconnected “patchwork” dentistry.

 3. Good dentistry may be expensive, but not as much as bad dentistry. Many patients try to “shop” for the cheapest dentist they can find. Often, unknowingly these patients can find themselves in inexperienced hands or with a dentist who uses inferior materials or laboratory services, resulting in ill-fitting dental appliances or dentistry that fails or breaks down quickly.

 4. Change the oil. The same way that you need to maintain that new car that you drive off the lot, many patients finish large treatment plans and do not understand the need for follow up care or maintenance. Besides the obvious benefits of prevention, the periodic maintenance is a key component of your ability to function with any restorative treatment you may receive, and the ability of this dentistry to last – including fillings, to veneers, crowns, implants and dentures. 

 5. The head bone’s connected to the neck bone. In other words, your mouth is very much a reflection of what can be going on in the rest of your body, and the oral/systemic link is a major topic of interest in medical research. In fact, oral disease puts you at greater risk of diseases of your heart, brain, liver, and pancreas to name a few. Conversely, good oral health is linked to living a longer and healthier life. Keep those regular dental checkups and cleanings.

Added to Dentistry, Illness Prevention, Wellness, Smart Patient on Thu 03/03/2011 <!– Comments –>

Gum Disease Can Lead to Heart Disease

Recent medical research has caused many doctors to reach a startling conclusion: gum disease and heart disease are linked. Since heart disease is usually fatal, it is clear that gum disease can actually kill you.

The American Dental Association estimates that 8 out of 10 Americans have periodontal (gum) disease. If this were any other affliction, such as AIDS or tuberculosis, it would be considered epidemic! Most dentists think it is just that.

They also knew that gum disease would never be labeled epidemic because, “no one ever dies from it.” The worst is that you lose your teeth. Not pleasant -but certainly not life threatening.

But that’s all changed.

The American Academy of Periodontology reports: “studies found periodontal infection may contribute to the development of heart disease, increase the risk of premature, underweight births, and pose a serious threat to people whose health is already compromised due to diabetes and respiratory diseases.”

Periodontal disease is characterized by bacterial infection of the gums. These bacteria can travel into the bloodstream – straight to the heart.

Another Problem: Gum and Bone Disease that goes Undetected – Solution: Promote health through awareness

Prevention is an overused word in our vocabulary, but we all know it works.

You see it in what you do every day. Who wouldn’t rather prevent a crisis than manage one?

Awareness of gum and underlying bone disease is very low. Only 50% of the population visits a dentist on a regular basis. Of that 50%, 80% have some degree of gum and bone disease. It is an epidemic. Were this any other disease, we would be calling on the CDC for immediate action!

Now the Good News

With advanced periodontal disease, the treatment is surgical. Gum surgery is never fun, but it is almost always successful in controlling the condition, and it’s usually covered by common insurance plans.

With mild periodontal disease, there are very effective NON-surgical procedures which, coupled with improved dental hygiene, can virtually halt the spread of the disease. This, too, is usually covered under most dental insurance plans.

If you haven’t yet contracted periodontal disease, I suggest breaking out the floss right now at least once a day, along with regular professional cleanings and twice-a-day brushings. Routine brushing should seem more purposeful now, more a part of your general health care, and not just something you do to prevent cavities.

Why do you need to have regular dental care check-ups?

Regular check-ups are needed to monitor your overall dental health. In addition to checking for cavities, Dr. Ushma Patel examines the health of your entire mouth and surrounding soft tissues, checking for pre-cancerous or cancerous lesions, oral sores and gum disease.

Your oral health is connected with your general health. Dental care check-ups can alert the dentist to other medical conditions that have symptoms in the mouth such as diabetes, nutritional deficiencies and hormonal irregularities. Regular dental visits are vital to prevent tooth decay, gum disease, and other conditions affecting your mouth. Also at your regular dental check up you will be able to get your teeth cleaned.
Healthy Gums … Healthy Hearts

Scientists at the University of Georgia have discovered that an enzyme in a common bacterium is capable of activating blood-clotting in the human body. This is the first reported evidence of such an effect and may help explain the link between periodontal infection and heart disease. A number of other studies have shown this.

Periodontal disease is usually a painless condition whose only signs may be red or bleeding gums. In early stages, regular brushing and flossing and preventive visits to our office will remove the bacteria and prevent the problems that gum disease can cause.
Now we can tell you that taking good care of your teeth and gums could have positive effects on other parts of your body

For more information contact Dr. Ushma. Patel at (770) 623-8750 or visit www.hitechsmiles.com

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Healthy Atlantans Seek a Fresh Start in Dental Care

It seems like so many people try to hit the reset button on January first. It’s an age-old ritual of self-evaluation and goal setting, and then predictably forgetting about our intentions sometime along the line of mid-January.

I am here to do more than passively listen to my patients’ intentions. I play an integral role in their overall health through preventative care, education, reinforcing positive habits, and open accessibility. My dental practice is easy to reach from anywhere in the Johns Creek, Duluth, Cumming and Alpharetta area in Georgia and my team will work with you to set up convenient appointments and respect your time while you are here.

I want you to know it is never too late to take control of your dental hygiene, or even start over again if you’ve tried before and faltered. No matter how long it has been since you have seen a dentist, I am not here to scold. I am here to welcome you back and help you repair any outstanding dental issues. As a dentist, I regularly see the accumulated results of bad habits firsthand. The health of your mouth, teeth and gums is measurable, and I can give my patients the education, treatment, and tools necessary to arrest further damage.

Do you need a reason other than an occasional cavity, sore or bleeding gums, or bad breath to take oral hygiene seriously in your quest for self-improvement or recommitment to health in 2010?

I’d like to share something with you that many people are surprised to learn. Medical experts have discovered a link between periodontal (dental) disease and coronary (heart) disease. Many of my patients are amazed to learn about this correlation, but experts have actually found that the bacteria in a person’s mouth can travel into the bloodstream through the gums and clump in artery plaques.

According to the American Academy of Periodontology, people with periodontal disease are nearly twice as likely to have coronary disease. The health of a person’s mouth is becoming as much of a predictor of heart disease as the cholesterol levels we’ve relied on to warn us of coronary issues in the past.

With the start of the New Year and with the spirit of self-assessment we all feel comes with it, won’t you speak to your dentist about taking care of any outstanding dental issues you may be experiencing?

Please contact me or your regular dentist to take your daily habit of brushing one step further. You’re already halfway there when you pick up the toothbrush; you adopt the rest of a good dental strategy to keep your mouth—and potentially your life, strong and healthy?